Archiving Our Legacy: A Capstone for our 30th Anniversary

April 13, 2021: As a capstone to mark 30 years of community, advocacy and accomplishments, LGBT Returned Peace Corps Volunteers today gifted its story archive to the Peace Corps Community Archive at the American University Library.

Everyone can continue to access and navigate our historic archive via the American University Library portal at https://wayback.archive-it.org/1435/*/https:/lgbtrpcv.org/

Our stories of service will now be preserved for future generations interested in the global impact of queer Peace Corps Volunteers.

With this legacy preserved, our organization is going on hiaitus and closing a chapter begun in 1991. Read about some of our milestone accomplishments in this post by our longtime national coordinator Mike Learned.

If you are interested in organizing a queer RPCV affiliate organization for the next generation of Peace Corps Volunteers, please contact the National Peace Corps Association.

We thank our members, contibutors and partners around the world for an incredible 30 years!

In service and frienship,
The LGBT RPCV Steering Committee

World Report 2018: Fighting for Rights Succeeds

Human Rights Watch‘s World Report 2018 summarizes key human rights issues in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide, drawing on events from late 2016 through November 2017.

In his keynote essay, “The Pushback Against the Populist Challenge,” Executive Director Kenneth Roth says that the surge of authoritarian populists appears less inevitable than it did a year ago. Then, there seemed no stopping a series of politicians around the globe who claimed to speak for “the people” but built followings by demonizing unpopular minorities, attacking human rights principles, and fueling distrust of democratic institutions. Today, a popular reaction in a broad range of countries, bolstered by some political leaders with the courage to stand up for human rights, has left the fate of many of these populist agendas more uncertain.

CLICK HERE to view full report and browse by countries

 

2017 LGBT RPCV Pride Shirts

CLICK HERE to purchase your 2017 LGBT RPCV Pride Shirts right now
Campaign live until May 11th with expected deliveries by June 1st.

Funds collected from this campaign will be utilized to cover annual operating expenses. Additionally, we hope to also be able to provide assistance via Peace Corps Partnership Grants to projects that align with our mission. If enough is raised, we also look forward to providing funds to for in-person socials during the Pride season this summer and fall for our members across the US.

Thanks for supporting us!

Capture

Freedom To Marry Movie

Click image to find a screening near you

The Freedom To Marry is the behind-the-scenes story of the architects of this historic civil rights movement and the brilliant, nerve-wracking campaign to win same sex marriage throughout the United States. The nail-biting, untold story of how same-sex marriage became law of the land. The Freedom To Marry  follows RPCV Evan Wolfson (Togo 1978-1980), the architect of the movement, civil rights attorney Mary Bonauto and their key colleagues on this decades long battle, culminating in a dramatic fight at the United States Supreme Court. More than the saga of one movement’s history, this is an inspiring tale of how regular people can change the world.

CLICK HERE to find a screening near you.

Evan Wolfson biography:
Wolfson is known as the national architect of the same-sex marriage movement. Having written his third year thesis paper at Harvard Law in 1983 on the subject, Wolfson began advocating for the freedom to marry when almost every gay rights leader was adverse. People thought he was ‘crazy’, and that he was seriously overreaching. After AIDS ravaged the LGBT community, and the need for legal protections became clear, Wolfson (as an attorney at Lambda Legal Aid) renewed his push for marriage. He claimed not only that same sex marriage could only become a legal reality, but that by working towards that goal, LGBT Americans could improve their status on a huge host of other fronts.

National Coordinator, Manuel Colón, and Evan Wolfson at a screening of The Freedom to Marry in Santa Monica, CA

In the early 1990s, Wolfson helped fight the first successful legal marriage court battle, in Hawaii. As the movement began to gain traction, he founded, Freedom to Marry, a not-for-profit which spearheaded the strategy and the national campaign. His genius came from an acute understanding of history, and other civil rights campaigns. His catch-phrases like, “wins trump losses”, and “there is no marriage without engagement” underpinned what soon become a national and international movement.

Evan was first to understand that, while marriage battles could be won in court, it would require changing the ideology of the nation – helping non-gay people understand that gays and lesbians were ‘people too’ – to make ‘wins’ happen, and to make them stick.

As he predicted, his early efforts were met with intense opposition from the masses, the Church and even the White House. Unperturbed, Wolfson helped devise and implement a cohesive strategy that included public education, grassroots mobilization, PR, polling, messaging, fundraising, social media campaigns and carefully orchestrated legal efforts. Evan, himself, spent decades criss-crossing America, speaking at every event, large and small, guiding and leading the campaign to win hearts, minds and victories. These efforts led to his eventual moniker, Mr. Marriage.

Wolfson began working on the marriage movement, there was not a single town in America where gay people had even a shred of legal protection. As of this writing, gay marriage is now legal not only throughout America, but in 22 other countries on five continents.

Ironically, having fought the government for decades and won, ironically, Wolfson eventually put himself out of business. Having achieved his organization’s stated mission, he happily closed Freedom to Marry in December, 2015. His staff (with this remarkable victory on their resume) has gone on to key positions at other LBGT and civil rights organizations throughout the United States.

After a short vacation, Evan returned to New York, where he resides with his husband, Cheng He. He has become extremely active in a variety of other campaigns for social justice (including LGBT anti-discrimination) not only in this country, but around the world. Interestingly, much of his current work is now currently sponsored by the US State Department, which has requested Evan to provide his expertise to other nations currently embarking on same sex marriage battles.

Peace Corps Week 2017

Peace Corps Week commemorates President Kennedy’s establishment of the Peace Corps on March 1, 1961. During this annual event, the Peace Corps community celebrates all the ways that Peace Corps makes a difference at home and abroad and renews its commitment to service.

This year the Peace Corps Week theme is Highlighting Hospitality: How does your Peace Corps Country Make People Feel Welcome? Volunteers are often humbled by the hospitality of their Peace Corps country. Share those traditions of hospitality and feelings of welcome with the world this Peace Corps Week.

In 2017 there are many ways you can join in the celebration.

Anyone

Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and RPCV Groups

Be sure to tell us about your planned events in the RPCV Portal so we can send you promotional items to share at your events and a Peace Corps t-shirt.

  • Host a film festival to showcase the Video Challenge finalist videos. We’ll share the link to the videos here when it’s available.
  • Host an International Festival.
  • Host a Story Slam with the theme of welcome or hospitality.
  • Write a blog post about traditions of hospitality in your host country. Share your blog on Facebook and tag @PCThirdGoal and #PCW2017.
  • How do you say “welcome” in your host country’s language? Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram tagging #hostcountryhello and #PCW2017.
  • Connect with a classroom and teach U.S. students about traditions of hospitality in your host country.

Educators

SOURCE: “Peace Corps Week.” Peace Corps Week. Peace Corps, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2017.