New LGBT Employee Resources Group, SPECTRUM, Launched at Peace Corps

In Peace Corps’ efforts to become a more diverse and inclusive work place, the agency has launched and initiative to form affinity-based employee resource groups. Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are agency supported groups which bring together staff from across the agency because of a common sense of identity that may be associated with their ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, professional experience, faith, disability or life interest. ERGs can be designed to provide support and professional development to participating members while also affording the organization a chance to gain valuable insight into effective recruitment and retention approaches.

Peace Corps joins the ranks of many public and private sector organizations which have begun to thoughtfully engage their diverse workforces via ERGs. At headquarters there has always been a small but mighty LGBTQ community. As such, when the opportunity for ERG formation presented itself the queer community mobilized. In March of 2013, members of SPECTRUM submitted a petition – with nearly 100 signatures – for formal recognition to Peace Corps’ Chief of Staff and the Office of Civil Rights and Diversity.

With approval from Peace Corps’ leadership, SPECTRUM has already started working diligently to fulfill its mission of raising awareness of LGBTQ issues and concerns related to Peace Corps staff (domestic and international) experience. The group focuses on three key areas:

  • Organizing and hosting discussion sessions about the LGBTQ experience for Peace Corps staff. The goal of these discussions is to share the voice of the Peace Corps LGBTQ community and foster a more inclusive work environment for all Peace Corps staff regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. SPECTRUM hosted its first panel discussion on May 22, 2013 with representatives from Human Rights Campaign, USAID, Department of Justice and the RPCV community.

  • Working with Peace Corps senior leadership, Africa, Europe, Mediterranean, Asia, Inter-America and Pacific regional staff; and internal working groups to identify strategies, provide resources, and offer appropriate staff training content to enhance the support provided to LGBTQ Volunteers serving overseas to bolster the likelihood of successful fulfillment of their 27-month service commitment. Members of SPECTRUM have been thoughtfully involved in the conversations leading up to the May 21, 2013 announcement of inviting same-sex couples to apply for service.

  • Providing opportunities for the Peace Corps LGBTQ community to foster a sense of community, support and shared purpose. Members of SPECTRUM worked hand in hand with the DC Regional Recruitment Office to organize and 80 person contingent at the DC Pride Parade and an information table at the festival.

While SPECTRUM is in its early stages of development, we welcome the thoughts and ideas of the RPCV community. Please reach out to us at SPECTRUM@peacecorps.gov

All comments are welcome!

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LGBTQ Panel Discussion Sponsored by Peace Corps’ Spectrum

– Edwin S. Patout, RPCV – Ukraine

I attended “The LGBTQ Experience in International Development” panel discussion held at Peace Corps Headquarters’ Shriver Hall on Wednesday May 22, 2013. The event announcement was posted on Facebook and co-sponsored by Spectrum and the Office of Civil Rights Diversity. This was an inaugural event for Spectrum, an employee resource group (ERG) for Peace Corps LGBTQ staff, volunteers and allies. Its mission is to raise awareness around LGBTQ issues and concerns related to Peace Corps Volunteer and staff experience. Information about this resource group can be found by emailing spectrum@peacecorps.gov .

The four panelists, all with extensive LGBTQ experience, specifically addressed the visibility issues faced in foreign countries by the LGBTQ community. The panelist included:
* Ty Cobb, a Senior Legislative Counsel at the Human Rights Campaign;
* Ajit Joshi, Acting Senior LGBT Coordinator at USAID;
* Bijal Shah, Associate Counsel, Immigration Review at the Department of Justice; and
* Dominique Narcisco, RPCV, Costa Rica, 2008-2010

Each panelist presented their perspective on the special challenges LGBTQ Peace Corps volunteers face in their new environment and what is probably going to be a life in isolation. The emphasis however should be on the opportunities presented by Peace Corps service; to provide support for other LGBT in the field; mentoring youth without having to out them; and providing education to a broader audience through displaying safe place stickers and offering diversity trainings to local staff on how to become a more inclusive community. The common theme of fostering inclusion and cultivating allies was developed in each of the panelist excellent presentations. A full house at Shriver Hall responded with thoughtful questions and was appreciative of the panels unique insight.

Interesting and informative to me, not a Human Resources person, was the sponsoring organization Spectrum, an LGBTQ Employee Resource Group (ERG). Learning that ERG’s are an emerging part of human resources toolkit for enhanced employee engagement. Certainly the formation of an LGBTQ ERG is no easy task and a challenge for LGBTQ employees that requires courage but is a path to form social/mentoring networks and create workplace environment that is more inclusive. Kudos to the LGBTQ Peace Corps staff on their efforts in establishing Spectrum with best wishes for much success.

Post Script: Not more than a few days ago after working on a draft of this article Spectrum appears in my life again as a Facebook posting. My alma mater LSU, for the first time sponsored an LGBT–inclusive 2013 graduation, offering lavender stoles to wear with cap and gowns. Spectrum is LSU’s LGBTQ sponsoring organization. Spectrum maybe the new human resource buzz word reflecting a broad range of diversity within an organization but for me it signifies a full circle.

Edwin Patout can be contacted at edwinpatout@yahoo.com.

A Rainbow Week at Peace Corps Connect

In conjunction with the National Peace Corps Association(NPCA)’s annual gathering, Peace Corps Connect, LGBT RPCV participated in a variety of different social and educational events. Below is a brief summary of each of the events.

Rainbow Happy Hour
THURSDAY – With collaboration from Spectrum, Peace Corps’ ERG, LGBT RPCV hosted a happy hour for our collective membership and guests at Nelly’s Sports Bar to begin the weekend of Peace Corps filled activities. We had over four dozen guests join us; from RPCVs that served in the first decade of Peace Corps inception to invitees leaving for serve in a few days. The event provided a casual evening of fellowship and networking for DC-area locals as well as a warm reception for guests out of town. We always enjoy being able to provide the space for our community to come together in-person and create strong connections. If you’re interested in hosting something similar in your area, CONTACT US, and let us know!

Rainbow History of Peace Corps
FRIDAY – As part of the NPCA’s conference theme of “Peace Corps Beyond”, LGBT RPCV was proud to host a session on the rich history the Peace Corps has in relation to sexual orientation and gender identity(SOGI) diversity. Panelists included James “Jim” Kelly, whose 1992 master’s thesis titled “Hidden dimensions of diversity: gays and lesbians in the Peace Corps” provided much of the foundation for early conversations with Peace Corps on the topic of sexual orientation and gender identity; Ralph Cherry an “unlimited” employee at Peace Corps headquarters, where he played various roles in the volunteer delivery system, from recruiting to placement to staging. He completed his 28-year career as a Country Desk Officer in the Africa Region and as Acting Deputy Chief of Operations. In all these capacities, he was witness to, and a direct facilitator of, the evolution of policies affecting LGBT volunteers and staff and; Daniel Hinkle, the current same-sex couples initiative coordinator with Peace Corps’ Office of Overseas Programming and Training, who discussed his role with Peace Corps and his thoughts on the future of where SOGI will continue to shape and influence Peace Corps’ operations.

In the spirit of historical celebration, this session engaged participants to collectively reflect just how far the Peace Corps,as an agency, has come in dealing with issues of sexual orientation and gender identity. Additionally, it provided a space for allies among the RPCV community to become better educated about the current same-sex, transgender, and other LGBT-related initiatives Peace Corps is currently engaged in.


Honoring of LGBTQ Peace Corps Pioneers

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(L-R) Ralph Cherry, Jim Kelly, Manuel Colón,and Daniel Hinkle

FRIDAY – As a token of appreciation, Spectrum hosted both Jim and Ralph to an afternoon reception at Peace Corps headquarters to thank them not only for their participation on the day’s panel and their involvement with this week, but their decades of experience and work that has contributed to the positive progression of inclusion for LGBTQ+ individuals in the Peace Corps Corps community. The reception was attended by members of Spectrum, LGBT RPCV,and their guests. Jim and Ralph were also presented with certificates signed by the Director, Carolyn Hessler-Radelet. They read as follows:

 

 

For James Kelly:
With respect and gratitude for your invaluable contributions and exceptional dedication to the Peace Corps and its LGBT family. Throughout your over 25 years of work at Peace Corps training centers around the world, publishing and sharing your influential Master’s thesis, “Hidden dimensions of diversity: gays and lesbians in the Peace Corps,”with the agency, and helping to foster a more supportive and inclusive Peace Corps for LGBT people, as well as your Peace Corps service in El Salvador, you have achieved a record of dedication that reflects the highest ideals of the Peace Corps.jimkellycertificate

For Ralph Cherry:
With respect and gratitude for your invaluable contributions and exceptional dedication to the Peace Corps and its LGBT family. Throughout your over 28 years of work at Peace Corps Headquarters, your effort to influence and create inclusive policies for LGBT staff and Volunteers, being a catalyst to the foundation of the LGBT RPCV group, and helping to foster a more supportive and inclusive Peace Corps for LGBT people, as well as your Peace Corps service in Ghana, you have achieved a record of dedication that reflects the highest ideals of the Peace Corps.

The Rainbow History of Peace Corps

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LGBT RPCV is proud to once again present a session at the National Peace Corps Association’s annual gathering, Peace Corps Connect. This year, our presentation is titled “The Rainbow History of Peace Corps”. A brief description will be provided below. To learn more about registration, CLICK HERE.

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When Peace Corps was founded in 1961, all prospective volunteers were required to disclose any homosexual tendencies they had – which would bar hem from service. Today, Peace Corps actively trains host countries for intercultural and diversity competencies to host same-sex couples. How did we get there? Where did we come from?

James Kim Kelly (El Salvador 1969-1972) will discuss his 1992 master’s thesis titled “Hidden dimensions of diversity: gays and lesbians in the Peace Corps” which provided the foundation for early conversations with Peace Corps on the topic of sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI).

Daniel Hinkle (El Salvador 2010-2012), the current same-sex couples initiative coordinator with Peace Corps’ Office of Overseas Programming and Training, will discuss his role with Peace Corps and his thoughts on the future of where SOGI will continue to shape and influence Peace Corps’ operations.

Ralph Cherry (Ghana 1969-1971) was fortunate enough to become an “unlimited” employee at Peace Corps headquarters, where he played various roles in the volunteer delivery system, from recruiting to placement to staging. He completed his 28-year career as a Country Desk Officer in the Africa Region and as Acting Deputy Chief of Operations. In all these capacities, he was witness to, and a direct facilitator of, the evolution of policies affecting LGBT volunteers and staff.

In the spirit of historical celebration, this session will engage participants to collectively reflect just how far the Peace Corps agency has come in dealing with issues of sexual orientation and gender identity. Additionally, it will assist allies among the RPCV community to become better educated about the current same-sex, transgender, and other LGBT-related initiatives Peace Corps is currently engaged in.

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LGBT RPCV will also be teaming up with Spectrum, Peace Corps’ LGBTQ Employee Resource Group, to sponsor a social mixer for our members, friends, and supporters. “Rainbow Happy Hour” will be on Thursday, September 22nd at 5:30pm at Nellies’ Sports Bar, 900 U St NW Washington, DC 20001. We can’t wait to see you all there!

 

Rainbow Happy Hour

Living & Working Abroad as an LGBTQ Peace Corps Volunteer

On Wednesday, July 1st, Peace Corps Diversity Recruiter Travis Bluemling held a live streamed webinar with four panelist regarding their experience in service as it relates to their their LGBTQ identity. If you missed it, don’t worry, it was recorded and hosted on YouTube – link below. Countries of service represented were Indonesia, Liberia, Paraguay, and Thailand.

The event was advertised as such:
“Please join us as we connect with currently serving and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers to discuss what it is like to serve as someone that identifies within the LGBTQ spectrum.  Hear their first hand experiences of living and working abroad! “

CLICK HERE to watch the recording of the webinar.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1iCuGyCwWg